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Posts Tagged ‘Behavior’

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: 3 Techniques You Can Implement Right Now

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By Grant Stenzel, MS Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor

Cognitive Behavioral TherapyCognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a remarkably helpful psychotherapy tool with a foundation that’s easy to learn, but difficult to execute: identifying inaccurate or negative thoughts when they arise so you can live with greater clarity and peace.… Read the rest →

How to Take Control of Automatic Thoughts

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By Aubrey Morris, Licensed Professional Counselor

perfectionist

How often do you think of things that you “should” or “have to” do? I’m not talking about taking a shower, going to school, or paying your bills. No, I mean thoughts like, “I have to be perfect”, “I should not make mistakes”, “I should not need help”, “I should be happy all of the time”, “I have to ______”…fill in the blank.… Read the rest →

Process Addiction: Understanding Impulsive and Addictive Behavior

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Process addictionThe concept of addiction to alcohol and other drugs is pretty well understood by most people. A chemical creates a reaction in the body that makes
us feel so good that it becomes impossible to live without it. But did you know we can react to behavioral stimuli in the exact same way?… Read the rest →

Youth and the Digital Age

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Deepak Santhiraj

By Deepak Santhiraj, MSW Licensed Clinical Social Worker

The Effect of Technology on Adolescents

In viewing the contemporary youth outlook in America, unique challenges kids face on a daily basis are apparent: conflicts with peers and parents combine with daily pressures to form a ceaseless helping of stress.Read the rest →

What I Do When My Kids Say, “OUCH!”

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By: Susan Stutzman, MA Licensed Professional Counselor

Recently, I watched my children play when one of my daughters tumbled a bit. As I went to check on her, I saw she was physically fine but momentarily a bit jostled. As I like to do, I began to help my daughter act out what happened and offer to kiss it, letting her know that I saw her tumble, would validate that it was scary and offer comfort.… Read the rest →